Little Known Facts About Blank Media

Let’s make no scruples about it: blank media is well past its prime. Sales of compact discs (CDs) and digital versatile discs (DVDs) have been sliding for years.  Analysts predict the medium to be phased out before the decade’s end. However, we should also point out that millions of CDs and DVDs continue to be sold annually for entertainment and utility purposes. Understanding the various types of blank discs can be confusing, so Linkyo Insights is here to make it simple for you by highlighting major CD and DVD formats–while they’re still relevant… When we talk about blank media today, we pretty much mean a optical disc. An optical disc works in a similar way to the old vinyl record: data is imprinted along a line that spirals out from the center of the disc to the edge. A laser, found inside a playing device, reads the printed data, allowing a user to access whatever music, imagery, or files are on-board. A basic disc has a single layer of spiraled data, but there are variants that can be had with more than one layer–and, hence, more storage. The Compact Disc was the first optical disc to become a success on the market. It was the result of a Philips/Sony collaboration in the early 1980s. The first CD hit the market in 1982, eventually hitting a commercial peak in 2000. The Compact Disc, measuring 4.8 in. in diameter, became the dominant medium for popular music, computer software, and video games in the 1990s thanks to the superior audio/video (A/V) and storage capacity it had over its predecessors. Blank CDs are available as either Recordable (CD-R) or ReWritable (-RW) and be manufactured for a wide variety of burning speeds. A user can burn data onto a CD-R only once, but is able to burn data onto a CD-RW multiple times. A typical (meaning single-layered) CD holds seven hundred megabytes (700 MB), or 74 min. of audio. For much of the 2000s, the Digital Versatile Disc was the mainstay of the home video market, succeeding where the LaserDisc (LD) and Video Compact Disc (VCD) failed. Philips, Sony, Panasonic, and Toshiba partnered to develop the DVD, which stored more data and produced better A/V quality than its predecessors. The DVD debuted in the United States in 1997, quickly becoming the primary medium for movies, TV shows, and a new generation of video games. The DVD’s video resolution is about twice that of its analog predecessor, the Video Home System (VHS) cassette. A blank DVD is widely available in either single-layer (SL) or dual-layers (DL) of storage. Storage ranges from 4.7 (SL) to 8.5 GB (DL). The DVD’s base storage of 4.7 GB is equivalent to that of seven (700MB) CDs. Like a CD, a DVD is available in either Recording (R) or ReWritable (RW) type. Unlike a CD, those DVD types are divided into competing sub-formats of Plus (ex. DVD+R) and Minus (ex. DVD–R). Plus is the newer of the two and uses a more integrated coding system that’s supposed to make it smooth-burning and error-resistant; in truth, the answer to which is superior is a source of unending debate. If you own a relatively new burner or player, it should play either format just fine. Finally, there’s the Blu-ray Disc (BD) format, a hi-def successor to the DVD that hit the market back in 2006. The BD was developed by a collection of corporations (such as Sony and Toshiba) and institutes (namely, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology). A BD can range from single to quadruple layers, carrying anywhere from 25 to 128...

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Tips on Labeling Your CD DVD Discs

DVD/CD Labeling Options We all have discs we haven’t yet labeled. Some of us have just a few; some of us have stacks or mounds or boxes or baskets of them. These collections grow every time we toss a new disc there, after we burn it but before we get around to labeling it. So how do you label a disc anyway? There are some good answers, some bad answers and some gorgeous answers, many of them right here.   Write Here If only you thought of this before! Yes, you can write directly on the disc. And yes, you can ruin the disc and maybe the drive when you do that – here’s how to make it work. Use a Sharpie. Other markers may also work fine, but some may not. Sanford (the makers of Sharpie) tells us that some marker inks can eat into the plastic and may make a disc troublesome, even useless. Sharpie markets a range of markers they offer specifically for use with CD/DVD media, so we’re naming them. Don’t use a ballpoint pen. Don’t use a pencil. Don’t use a crayon. Writing with a ballpoint or pencil can create enough pressure to damage the layer the laser has to scan, making it unreadable. Writing with a crayon can let wax transfer to the drive’s head or mechanism, leaving your disc just fine but your drive useless. The next time you shop for blanks discs (it’s too late for the discs already in that basket), you might want to choose among the Verbatim products with a white area on the label side that makes any printing you do easier to read. For some of us, alas, who can’t read our own writing, writing isn’t much help. As your grade school teacher may have advised (ours did), when you can’t write neatly, print.   Print a Label Overall these days, we find that people who have the gear to burn CDs also tend to have color ink jet printers. (OK, that’s obvious, but please don’t yawn). And certainly there are many products out there that let you print something on your inkjet printer and stick it onto a disc. And of course, of all those products, we like our Verbatim’s own Verbatim Touch-Less Labeling system best. Should you? With our system, you don’t touch the sticky part of the label, you can’t get centering wrong and the label goes down without a wrinkle. That last part is the best part. A wrinkled or off-center label on a disc spinning at high speeds could make it wobble causing playback trouble. But you decide.   Let the Drive Label the Disc HP (in cooperation with Mitsubishi Chemical, Verbatim’s parent company) debuted a neat product early in 2004 (headed for stores by the end of 2004) with a bright way of getting a label to appear from inside the drive that burns the disc. The HP Lightscribe drive cleverly changes the way the burner drives the laser to let it create a silkscreen-quality image on the “flip” (label) side of special, compatible discs. Since Verbatim helped develop the process, you can count on us to offer Lightscribe media for use with those drives.   Print Directly on the Disc Several printer brands – notably Primera, Epson and Casio – offer specialized printers that print right on a disc and don’t use paper. After you are done reading check out the great range of Verbatim printable CD and DVD media for each of these solutions. Primera is best known for its production duplicators (burner plus printer), but they also...

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