How to Make a CD or DVD Case from a Sheet of Paper

Many people just stack their CDs or DVDs and leave them laying out, exposed to many hazards. While these optical disc formats do have a certain amount of redundancy so that a disc player can recover lost information, leaving them exposed without some protection will put your videos, music, or data at greater risk that is necessary. Protection as simple as a paper cover can prevent contamination, nicks, or scratches in the disc surface. Preservation of discs is important and not at all difficult. In addition to, protecting the discs, the appearance of your storage location can be greatly improved if you do not have stacks of unprotected DVDs and CDs in multiple piles. A simple, basic sleeve or cover for these discs will also make them easier to clearly label and organize. You can make a simple case or sleeve for CDs or DVDs out of an regular sheet of paper. This is an easy and inexpensive way to protect and organize your precious video, music, or data discs. The instructions to do this are below. Instructions for Making a CD-DVD Sleeve or Case from a Sheet of Paper Step 1 – Start with a standard 8-1/2 x 11 sheet of paper. Step 2 – Fold the left and right side toward the center as shown. Step 3 – Form a pocket by folding the top down and creasing it. Step 4 – Now lift the pocket flap from step 3 back up half way. Then fold the left and right inside corners under that top flap at 45 degrees, as shown in this photo. Step 5 – Spread the sides of the pocket to the sides to make the “wings” shown here on the left and right sides. Step 6 – While folding that top flap of the pocket back down, tuck the wings in between the the front and back parts of the so they are not sticking out. Slip the disc into the pocket. Flatten the pocket so the disc will stay in the pocket. Now dog-ear the bottom corners as shown. Step 7 – Tuck the dog-eared flap into the pocket. Step 8 – You’re done with your simple protective cover for a CD or DVD. You can also write on the sleeve to indicate what it contains. Of course, if homemade paper cases aren’t your style, you can find great deals on cases and covers...

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Learn How to Convert MiniDV Tapes to DVD

Converting Mini-Digital Video (MiniDV) to DVD So you have tons of footage shot on your digital camcorder that uses a mini-cassette format for DV (digital video – also known as MiniDV), but you would like to have it on DVD. No problem. Copying them to a variety of digital formats, including DVD, is a snap. Your basic options are to copy the video content onto a DVD using a DVD recorder or to transfer them to digital format using your computer. If you use a computer you can easily edit using video tools as well as burn DVDs – a capability most computers have these days. Copying DV to DVD using a DVD Recorder If you have a DVD recorder as part of your home entertainment system, this is the most straightforward method. Just plug the output of cable of your MiniDV camcorder into one of the available inputs on your DVD recorder. Many models of DVD recorders have input connections available on the front specifically for connecting camcorders. You may want to take advantage of this, or you may want to take the trouble to use a rear connection – depending on what type of output you camcorder provides. Depending on the age and type of your camcorder, the non-camcorder end of the camcorder output cable could have several types of video connectors: Firewire HDMI S-Video RCA Audio-Video Your goal is to use the highest quality connection possible. Firewire and HDMI are the best options, followed by S-video, and finally RCA if that is what is available. So if your camcorder has a HDMI output and the DVD recorder has HDMI input, then take advantage of it. The improved quality will be worth it. If you find you have a compatibility issue, you can buy adapter cables for converting just about all connection styles. Shopping on-line for cables and adapters can save you a bundle over buying them at retail stores. Just search for what you need (i.e. RCA to HDMI adapter). Once you’ve made the connection, the rest is a snap. Put a recordable DVD in the recorder (it may take a moment for it to read and load the DVD), place a DV you would like to duplicate in the DV camcorder. Now select the Input on the recorder that the camcorder is connected. If you are unsure, press play and toggle through the inputs looking for the video signal coming from the camera. Once you find it, stop the camcorder and rewind it to the desired starting place (if necessary). Now press record on the DVD recorder and press play on the camcorder. Keep going until you have recorded all the DV tapes you wish to transfer. Copying DV to DVD using a Computer There are several advantages to using a PC to copy your digital video tapes. First, if you don’t already have a DVD recorder, you can buy what you need to use you computer for less than you can buy a DVD recorder or DVR. Next, it is easy to edit and otherwise work with your video content (including adding a soundtrack) using a computer and some video software. Again, the first critical step is determining the connectivity between the DV camcorder and the computer. Some PCs and Macs come equipped with HDMI and Firewire connections. If you can use these to connect directly between your computer and camcorder then all you need is a video application capable of video capture and editing. If you cannot connect directly, then you need an adapter that can connect your camcorder output to the computer...

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How to Convert Home Movies to DVDs

Converting home movies on VHS or Hi-8 video cassettes to DVDs present a minimal problem. VCRs and VHS or Hi-8 camcorders have RCA style video and audio outputs that can be easily connected to a DVR or a DVD Recorder, and to a computer USB port using an adapter and video software. Unlike VHS and Hi-8 cassettes played on VCRs and camcorders, older film reels of home movies present a different challenge when it comes to converting them to a digital format. Most old 8mm projectors do not have video output jacks. The old projectors never converted the movies to any analog signal – they simply passed the images on film in front of the projector bulb. There is no easy way to directly dub this content to a digital format. Consider Using an 8mm Film to Digital Conversion Service So if you have reel tapes of 8mm or Super 8 home movies that you would like to upgrade to digital, you might want to shop around for a service that can convert the tapes. It wouldn’t hurt to get a good idea of the cost involved in using the service before deciding to do it yourself. Depending on how many tapes you have and your discretionary spending budget, paying someone else to do it may be the best option. Perhaps members of the family like siblings and cousins would even be happy to chip in for the conversion if they end up with their own copies. Getting a group of contributors could make this option more affordable. You can look online for conversion services, but don’t forget to check locally. While it may cost a few more dollars to use a local service, you would have the peace of mind of hand-delivering and retrieving your precious vintage home movie footage without the risk of it being lost or damaged during shipping. Also, be sure you are comparing apples to apples. The level of service and quality of conversion varies greatly between providers. Do a little homework and find out what you will get for your money. You Can Convert 8mm or Super 8 Film to Digital Yourself If your budget doesn’t allow using a service, don’t worry – you can still covert the old reels to digital yourself. You just need: A functional 8mm or Super 8 reel projector A digital video camera (and any required media for recording like DVDs) A good projection surface (a screen, a flat white wall, etc.) A tripod An audio cable As you might guess at this point, the best way to convert those old home movies to digital yourself is to project them onto a good projection surface and record them using a digital video camera. Obviously, you want to put the 8mm projector on a nice stable surface, and have a good stable tripod for the digital video camera, so it can be focused properly on the image to get the best possible result. Important Tips for Converting 8mm Film to Digital Here are some things to keep in mind while converting those 8mm reels to digital: Keep the Projected Image Small: A rule of thumb is that the smaller the image, the sharper it will be. So focus the projected image so it is fairly small yet easily visible. This usually also involves having the projection surface not too far away from the projector. Focus the Digital Camera to Maximize the Image: Adjust the digital video camera so that the image fills the recording (without losing any part of the image) while minimizing the amount of the unused projection...

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How to Use Your PC to Transfer Video Tapes to DVD

You see it in so many homes – including yours. Shelves, stacks, and boxes of old VHS and video tapes we just don’t want to get rid of. They have our favorite episodes of Seinfeld, our treasured home videos, and a backlog of movies recorded from HBO or Showtime that we just never got around to watching. Why Convert VHS to DVD? There are a few problems with keeping these old VHS video tapes: VHS Tapes are Bulky: With VHS tapes, a few hours of video takes up as much space as a book. Converting VHS to DVD means storing the same video content on a small stack of disks – probably taking up less space than just a few of VHS tapes. VHS and Video Tapes Deteriorate and Break: Analog tapes, whether VHS or 8mm cassettes, degrade over time much more rapidly than digital disks. While storing tapes in constant temperature and humidity helps delay deterioration, the longer you wait to transfer video tapes to digital disks the lower the quality will be. Plus, cassette tapes have mechanical moving parts that are more likely to break or malfunction the older they become. VHS Tapes are Obsolete: VHS tapes and players are rapidly going the way of the dinosaur. If you keep waiting to do something with your old video tapes, one day you will find yourself with no way to play or reproduce them. Then you may end up spending big money to pay a professional to salvage your precious home movies. How Do I Convert My Video Tapes to DVD? There are several ways to copy VHS or other video tapes to DVD. If you have a VHS player (or a camcorder) and a component DVD recorder, just connect the output of the VHS player to the input of the DVD recorder and record directly to the DVD. Some of you may even have dual VHS and DVD recorder decks. Most of these have a dubbing function that will make copying the tape to DVD easy and fast. Whether or not you have a DVD recorder to use for copying your tapes, consider using your PC for converting them to DVD. First, if you don’t have a DVD recorder, you probably have a DVD burner on your PC. You can buy the tools needed to use your PC to convert the tapes for much less than you can buy a component DVD recorder. Second, while direct dubbing will copy your tapes, using a PC gives you tremendous power to easily edit and create DVDs you will actually want to watch. Plus, you can add background music and soundtracks. Using a PC to Transfer VHS to Digital is Easy! Using the power of your PC to capture and transfer analog videos to digital DVDs has never been easier. In the past it may have involved buying a video card and opening your PC to install it in an open PCI slot. Next you installed the video card drivers, then you crossed your fingers and hoped it all worked. Now it is almost as easy as plugging in a USB cable. A number of manufacturers provide exactly what you need to make it fast and simple. Just search on-line for “VHS to DVD Converter” or visit your favorite technology store. Comprehensive packages include the hardware and software needed to transfer your old tapes. The software makes it easy to capture and edit the video. The hardware adapter connects your computer’s USB port to the RCA style jacks for video (yellow) and audio (red and white or black) found on...

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How to Print DVD or Video Game Covers

Going through the game of life, often times things get lost or misplaced. Your car keys? Gone. Your MP3 player? Disappeared. Your homework? Dog ate it. Your DVD or video game cases? Missing as well. While we can’t help you find your car keys, MP3 player, or get your homework back; we can help by providing a guide to print your own DVD or video game covers. Let us begin:The following instructions are for Adobe Photoshop: Start up Photoshop and open the cover you downloaded by going to File > Open. Select the cover image. First we need to check the dimensions and resolution of the image by going to Image > Image Size (Alt + I + I). If the image is sized properly, then just cancel out of this. When you are ready to print the cover, go to File > Print with Preview. Click Page Setup to select the correct paper size and orientation. Ensure that you have 8.5×11 (with borderless enabled) or 8.5×14 selected for your paper and you set to the page orientation to landscape. Click Ok to close out of Page Setup. Your image should now appear centered in the middle of your paper in the preview window. Ensure the checkbox for “Scale to Fit Media” is unchecked as the image should already be at the proper size. Click Print to begin printing. If you need a place to download DVD or video game covers, here are some resources that you will find very useful: The Cover Project CD Covers.cc DVD Town You probably have many reasons why you want to print your own video game covers. Maybe you are not happy for the box art that came from the manufacturer, maybe the game didn’t come with a case (such as Wii Sports bundled with the Nintendo Wii game system), or you want to replace those flimsy Nintendo Gameboy Advanced boxes that have been crushed. Whatever the reason, rest assure, printing out a video game cover is just as easy as printing one for a DVD case. Follow the steps below to print a Nintendo Gameboy Advance cover to fit the case of a Nintendo DS game: Scan in the front, back, and side of your GBA box into 3 different images at 300dpi. Trim off the edges of the each of the scanned images. This is to remove any worn edges of the box. Resize the front and back of the boxes to 1535×1370. Clean up the scanned image of the side of the box as this image will be used for the spine of the cover. Resize the spine to 190×1370 and paste the GBA Spine Logo into the image and align it to the very top. Shift your spine image (game logo) around until it looks good. This is a subjective thing and takes a little tweaking. Create an image that is 3260×1370 and copy and paste the previous 3 images into it and align them end to end. Save it with a quality of 10 to 12 and you are done. Here are the dimensions required to print a Nintendo DS cover courtesy of The Cover Project: Front and Back length x height: 1535px(5.117″) x 1370px(4.567″). Spine (middle area) length x height: 190px(0.633″) x 1370px(4.567″). Now that you are ready to do some heavy printing, you need the right equipment and supplies to get the job done. Of course, to make things easier on you, we’ve gone ahead and compiled such a list: Epson Stylus R260 – Not only a inkjet color printer but also has the ability to...

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How to Format USB Flash Drive

If you want to format your USB flash drive or flash memory card, you can follow these steps: Plug your USB flash drive or memory card into the USB slot of your computer. Normally your system should find it as a removable disk drive automatically. Open "My Computer" and right click the removable disk drive you have just inserted. Click "Format" on the menu that pops up. A dialogue box named "Format Removable Disk" should appear. Select "FAT 32" under the File System and make sure Quick Format is not selected. (If you are not sure, just leave all the selections as default.) Click the "Start" button. A pop-up will inform you that the format action will erase all the data in the flash memory. Make sure you want to erase all data on the disk before you click OK. The formatting process will start once you click "OK". Now your formatting is complete and  you can enjoy your flash memory. Congrats! You’ve learned to format any Flash Drive or memory...

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