Why Buy LINKYO Remanufactured Epson Ink Cartridges?

If you’re on the market to buy a remanufactured Epson ink cartridge, you should know that there are two types of such cartridges on the market, one based on a new chip and the other based on a reset chip. What’s the difference? I’ll explain. A cartridge’s chip serves two purposes: To tell the printer the cartridge’s model and color To tell the printer the cartridge’s model and color A compatible cartridge’s chip uses a “page counter” to calculate the amount of ink is inside the cartridge; this method is inaccurate because it estimates the amount of ink based on the number of pages it has printed on. Each page, regardless of how much ink is actually used, is based on a pre-programmed estimate. Let’s illustrate this problem using Epson’s compatible 127 ink cartridges and the image above. The Epson compatible 127 cartridge has a calculated yield of 755 pgs. A printer will be equipped with colors black, cyan, magenta, and yellow. Magenta would be the primary color to print the image above. If you were to print out 377 pages of that image (half the 127 cartridge’s total yield), you’d have a printer reading the compatible magenta cartridge as being half-empty. The problem here is that the chips in the three other colors–black, cyan, and yellow–would also run as half-empty. Any color print, no matter what color is really being used, triggers the page counter in all the color cartridges. In the worst-case scenario, you could end up having an ink cartridge read as “empty” when it could actually be almost full. Let’s say you own one of these models of Epson WorkForce printers: WF-3520 WF-3530 WF-3540 WF-7010 WF-7510 WF-7520 All these printers can use a single model of ink cartridge, the Epson 127. The cartridges are available in four standard colors: black, cyan, magenta, and yellow. Cyan, magenta, and yellow have official yields of 755 pages. (Black has a higher yield than the rest.) Print 377 pages and, in theory, your cartridge is half-empty. Simple? Yes. Accurate? No. Let’s use an example with the above image showing of the two apples falling into water. Magenta is the primary color being used for this image. Print 377 pages of this image and your magenta ink cartridge will read as halfway-empty. You’re barely using the three other colors. Here’s where the problem of compatible ink cartridges creeps in. Even though magenta is the color being most affected, cyan and yellow would also read as being half-empty. (Black would read as being less empty because of its higher yield.) The “page counter” in each ink cartridge calculates based on a page used, no matter how much ink was really used in the process. In the worst-case scenario, you’d have an ink cartridge reading as empty when it could actually be almost full. You could have the reverse happen, as well: A cartridge could read as almost full when it’s really almost empty. This happens because a print could use up more color than is considered standard. Each of LINKYO’s remanufactured ink cartridges uses a reset chip from the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). This reset chip guides the cartridge’s sensor to make an accurate reading on how much ink is available. Using this system, printing the above butterfly image would only affect the readings of the cyan and black ink cartridges because those are the two being used. Had it been using the prior “compatible” model, all color readings–including magenta and yellow–would be lower, even though some colors weren’t even used. LINKYO remanufactured process involves cleaning and repairing the OEM ink...

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How to Fix Canon Printer Ink Error

Why am I getting Canon printer ink error – ink is emptry or low – after installing remanufactured Canon ink cartridges? It’s common for remanufactured Canon ink cartridges to read as empty or low. This is because the ink monitoring chip in the cartridge (especially the ones with built-in print heads) is intended for one-time use only. DON’T PANIC! Your remanufactured Canon ink cartridges are indeed full and ready to print. Simply ignore the message, click OK (or CONTINUE), and continue to print. Some printers, particularly Canon inkjet models, won’t print if the cartridge reads as empty. You’ll likely receive an error message, such as the following: Canon printer ink error message indicating that your ink is low or empty. Canon printer ink error message indicating that your ink has run out and for your to replace the cartridge You can bypass these error messages by holding down your printer’s RESUME, STOP/RESET, or COLOR START button for 5 to 15 sec. The ink monitor will shut off, the printer will stop blinking, and the printer itself will resume printing. Lastly, here are some more troubleshooting tips to help improve remanufactured Canon ink cartridge’s performance. Always perform printer cleaning cycle, deep cleaning, and alignment test after you install new ink cartridges in your printer. Print a few test pages to ensure proper ink flow and correct alignment. If the printer does not recognize the cartridge, remove the cartridge and gently wipe the electrical contacts of the cartridge using a clean paper towel or a lint-free cloth. This is to remove the dust and residue that may have been blocking the electrical contacts from the printer. If the printer still does not recognize the cartridge, try taking out the unrecognized cartridge, turn off the power on the printer and unplug the printer for about 30 to 60 seconds. Plug and power the printer back on and reinstall the cartridge and print. For cartridges with print heads, sometimes the cartridge has been kept flat or upside down for weeks or months, therefore inks are not reaching to the print head which prevents the new ink cartridge from printing. To clean, gently place the cartridge with the print head facing down on a damp paper towel until ink flow is visible. Reinstall the ink cartridge and...

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How to Quickly Fix DVD Drive Problems

It is so frustrating when you’re ready to watch a movie, play a game, or install a program, but you can’t because the DVD drive isn’t working. Here is a quick run down of how to get the drive working again. Find the category below that applies to the issue you having with the DVD drive, and follow the suggestions for determining the problem. Hopefully, you will be back on track and leave the frustration behind. Even installing a new DVD drive isn’t that hard. Of course, if you have trouble with a DVD drive, the first thing to try is another DVD. If the problem seems to be with a particular DVD disk, try cleaning it with a soft cloth or a DVD cleaning solution. If the drive doesn’t work for any DVD, then connections for external drives should be checked. For internal drives, check computer cooling fans, filters, and ventilation. DVD drives can sometimes be the most susceptible to heat problems. 1) The DVD Drive Has No Power The most common cause of this DVD problem is an issue with the power connection or power protection. This is particularly true with external drives. In other words, something is unplugged or there is an issue with something like a surge protector. Double check all the power connections. Plug other things into the outlet or outlet strip and see if they work. For internal DVD drives on desktop systems, the adventurous could remove the cover and try connecting a different power plug from the power tray. If the DVD drive starts to work, then there is a problem with the PC’s power supply to the DVD drive. If it doesn’t, then the DVD drive is not powering up. If the DVD drive remains dead and you know it is getting power, then it is probably time to buy a new DVD drive or schedule a repair. 2) The DVD Drive Does not Open – Has Power If the DVD seems to have power, but the DVD drive door does not open, press the button firmly a few times. If it still doesn’t work, try restarting the computer then opening the DVD drive. If the drive still doesn’t open then right click the DVD drive in the My Computer and select Eject. If that doesn’t work, it is time to resort to the DVD emergency eject. Poke the end of a paper clip into the tiny hole next to the DVD drive eject button. Be prepared to deal with an unseated disk that may be jamming things up or to keep the drive from immediately closing again. Using the emergency eject will also open the DVD drive when the computer power is off. 3) Windows Does not Recognize the DVD Drive If you loaded a DVD into the drive and it doesn’t seem to reading or loading the DVD, again the first thing to try is restarting the computer. If that doesn’t work, verify the status of the DVD drive. To check the status of the DVD drive, open My Computer, right click the drive and select Properties. The Properties Window will say if the device is working properly. If Windows recognizes a problem with the DVD drive’s hardware or drivers, it will be noted here. Properties can also checked by right clicking the device in the Windows Device Manager (Control Panel – System). The Device Manager will put exclamation marks next to device that are not working properly. Software and configuration issues can usually be solved with proper settings or reinstalling drivers. Drive settings can be added or altered...

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