Are Printer Warranties Voided by Compatible Toners?

For those of you concerned that by saving money with remanufactured toners or compatible toners you have voided the office’s photocopier and printer warranties, worry no more. While many are not aware of this, back in 1975 the U.S. Congress approved something called the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act. Thanks to Magnuson-Moss, you need not limit yourself to OEM toner cartridges in order to have your printer or photocopier warranty honored – in spite of the myths that scare customers into sticking to OEMs for fear they will void their printer warranties. However, if you need to have repairs or warranty work done by the place from which you purchased your equipment, you may want to remove the remanufactured or compatible toner cartridge before bringing it in. That way you eliminate possible hassles. Some companies may make excuses to save themselves money, as they may possibly have their own parts or warranty service plan. An unethical or unaware business may try to say that the remanufactured or compatible toner cartridge that you are using has inferior toner composition that may have damaged the equipment. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act ensures that as long as you use the printer/copier in the manner for which it was intended, you are free to use whatever product or brand of toner or ink cartridge that you believe to be suitable for your intended purpose. You can check this out in our SuperMediaStore toner FAQs  where we clearly state, “using a compatible/remanufactured toner cartridge will not void the manufacturer’s warranty.” A good analogy to having to use HP toner in HP machines for instance might be in buying a new Ford and being told that you can only use Chevron gasoline in it or your warranty will be voided. That should not happen, as once again, you have a freedom of choice in the products that you want to buy and use in whatever you purchase. Now if you bought a gas burning car but decided to use diesel fuel in it, that would void your warranty as it would be the wrong product for the application. The purpose of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Improvement Act was to stop the widespread practice of merchants misusing the express warranties and disclaimers on their products sold. The Act reads: MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY IMPROVEMENT ACT United States Code Annotated Title 15 Commerce and Trade Chapter 50 Consumer Product Warranties 15 Section 2302 (c) “No warrantor of a consumer product may condition his written or implied warranty of such product on the consumer’s using, in connection with such product, any article or service (other than article or service provided without charge under the terms of the warranty) which is identified by brand, trade or corporate name; except that the prohibition of this subsection be waived by the commission if: 1) The warrantor satisfies the Commission that the warranted product will function properly only if the article or service so identified is used in connection with the warranted product, and 2) The Commission finds that such a waiver is in the public interest.” You can read an explanation in layman’s terms at Law Info.com  For the protection of the consumers’ right to use compatible and remanufactured toners like this HP 80X toner without having their photocopier and printer warranties voided, we owe a thanks to the public-minded congressmen who sponsored the Warranty Improvement Act: John Moss (1911 – 2003), known as the “People’s Warrior”, Warren Magnuson (1905 – 1989), and Frank Moss. +Scott Roy Smith +LINKYO...

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Toner Performance and STMC Certification

Selecting printer cartridges with toner performance you can trust is not always easy, but a stamp of approval by the Standardized Test Methods Committee (STMC), makes it easier to narrow the search. STMC is a global committee that was enacted to promote and find standardized test methods for the OEM-compatible and remanufactured printer cartridge industry. The standards defined by STMC help set performance specifications that make aftermarket remanufactured and compatible toner cartridges equal to or sometimes better than OEM toner cartridges. Since these are standardized test methods, the test can be performed on any toner cartridge anywhere without bias. It’s important to note these standardized tests measure the performance of the toner cartridges; they do not specify how they must perform. Much like looking for the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval on household items, when you find the STMC stamp of certficiation on a toner cartrdige, you can be assured that the cartridge, such as the LINKYO toner cartridges have been tested using the STMC standards. The Standardized Test Methods Committee does not take this lightly. Those who perform these tests must first be successfully trained by an authorized STMC trainer to ensure the tests are performed properly. As of publication, there are 250 companies in 50 countries that have been STMC certified. But only 25 people in the whole world are authorized trainers. Working in conjunction with the STMC is the International Imaging Technology Council or International (ITC), which administers the program and maintains the proper usage and policies against abuse and misuse of the STMC program and logos. The letter given to the technicians who have completed the proper training must be signed by not only the STMC trainer but also by the ITC.  The certification is good for four years and then must be renewed. Part of the testing process uses ASTM test methods, such as ASTM F 2036 for image density and background and ASTM F 1859 for yield. The methods involved determine the comparison of a finished toner cartridge to another toner cartridge, usually an OEM or Original Equipment Manufacture. STMC certification assures the buyer that the remanufactured or compatible toner cartridge they are considering will provide almost the same or even better toner performance as an OEM toner cartridge. Because these tests are so conclusive in their results, some state and local buying contracts are awarded only to manufacturers who have the STMC certification. There are even private contracts that will only be awarded to STMC certified companies. You can see the list of certified companies at the International ITC website. The bottom line is if you want quality toner performance and good value, look for the SMTC seal of approval. +Scott Roy Smith +LINKYO...

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Can You Trust Remanufactured Toner Cartridges?

Can you trust remanufactured toner cartridges? The short answer is…”Yes!”  These have come a long way since the drill-and-fills that we all love to hate. Remanufactured toner cartridges are Original Equipment Manufacturer or “OEM” cartridges that have been remade using new and recycled parts. For instance, a company might take an original used up HP toner cartridge and replace some of the internal parts, such as a drum unit, that can wear out and make your toner cartridge unusable. By using OEM cartridges as a starting point, you can be assured that they will likely fit into your existing printer or copier just like a brand new cartridge. The advantage with the remanufactured toner cartridge is that it is considerably cheaper. Let’s look at an OEM HP 15A for example. As of October 2012, a brand new cartridge would cost you around $80.97, for the same 2,500 page yield that a remanufactured HP 15A offers at a fraction of the cost.  For around $29.99 or less, you would have an HP 15a remanufactured toner cartridge with the same capabilities and performance of a brand new OEM toner cartridge. One of the keys with remanufactured toner cartridges is to find a brand that is not only economically responsible, but also performs to your satisfaction. They are not all equal. Some companies are more diligent in the remanufacturing process of checking them out and fitting with parts. You may need to try a few different brands to see for yourself how reliable they might actually be or just go with brands that have good reputations. Keep in mind, that just because one might be a lot lower priced, this does not mean that it will not do the job of a higher priced “reman”, as they are colloquially known. Some are so good, that the reman’s quality is equal to the original. An example of differences by the manufacturers for instance might be, Company A will take a virgin cartridge, which is an OEM cartridge that has been collected, used, and remanufactured only one time. Company B might collect the used OEM cartridges and refit them over and over again. Company C might collect the old OEM toner cartridges and give them a cursory look over and replace only the obviously worn components instead of all of the parts known to fail. You can see that of these three examples Company A might be higher priced than Company C, but not be much more reliable than Company B. This is why you might need to experiment with a few brands to find the best fit for your own business or read reviews and use trusted brands at our store. One type of reman to avoid is the “refilled only.” This is the notorious “drill-and-fill” type. All sorts of malfunctions occur when  printing with these. Problems such as spreading toner powder all over the machine have earned them their bad rap. This type of remanufactured cartridge may appear dirtier or scratched up. You will also notice that the print quality is not up to par with a new or properly remanufactured cartridge. Because the drum units in some toner cartridges tend to  wear and fail more than any other component before the toner runns out, the most reliable remans will almost always replace the drum units inside the OEM cartridge being refitted. The bottom line is remanufactured toner cartridges from reliable brands perform nearly as well or as well as a brand new OEM toner cartridge and at a fraction of the cost. +Scott Roy Smith +LINKYO...

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Are Compatible Toners OK?

Lots of businesses want to save money using compatible toners but are unsure if they can trust them. So today I’m going to talk about compatible toner cartridges vs OEM (original) toners. Compatible toners are made with all new parts including the cartridge case. But many of them are manufactured usually outside of the United States in countries that want to compete in the manufacturing world, using the lowest-cost materials available to meet those goals. Because compatibles must differ from OEM toner cartridges to avoid copyright and patent law issues, there are slight variances that you may not even notice until you try to fit the compatible into your printer or copier. Some may fit too snugly or too loosely, and either way this could compromise the quality of your printing jobs. Though some compatible toners perform very well, even matching the original toner in quality, others might be very poor or mediocre at best. This is where the compatible manufacturer’s brand reputation will come into play. Getting to know which brands are reliable versus which are problem causers can save you much money and time in the long run. Another big difference between OEMs and compatible toners might be in the page yield. When considering quality, let us start with the plastics used as this is the major part of the compatible. Thickness of the plastic might be a big difference, making the cartridge more fragile in use than it appears and causing the fit to be problematic. Other parts such as a seal could fail, causing the toner to leak into your printer or copier. Some retailers and manufacturers take responsibility with a failed toner, but this doesn’t make up for time lost. So not only are brands important, but where you buy them also can make a big difference. Now let’s consider the differences between a compatible toner cartridge and a remanufactured toner cartridge. Remanufactured cartridges use original toner cases and sometimes have new parts replacing the original used parts. Environmentally, you can already see a big difference as they use far fewer natural resources. Compatibles have brand new cases and components, and manufacturing just one cartridge uses almost five pounds of natural resources.    Because the internal parts of a compatible, depending on the brand, can be of lower quality than original toners, compatibles are generally not remanufactured and used a second or more times. There are quite a few brands available in the market place so you may have to rely on your supplier or vendor to offer you the best available. If you check the reviews, you’ll see our own LINKYO toner brand has proven to be very reliable and cost effective. In conclusion, whether you are buying compatible toners, OEMs or remanufactured toner cartridges to save money, make sure you are using a brand and vendor that you can trust. Compatible toners can save you considerable money. +Scott Roy Smith +LINKYO...

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What is the Difference? Standard vs High Yield Toner

Shopping for toner can be confusing, especially if you’re not familiar with the differences of yield amounts. Standard, jumbo, extended, starter, high yield toner cartridges….What’s it all mean? The differences are good to know because shopping wisely will save you money and help save the planet. Before we get started, just a reminder in case you didn’t read my last blog about toner page yield — The page yields we’re going to look at are based on industry testing standards of 5% coverage, which equates to an average black and white page. This allows us an equal testing ground, so we’re not comparing apples to oranges. Big brands like HP follow these standards when testing yield. So do lower priced but high quality brands such as our LINKYO.  If the yield is higher based on 5% coverage, you can expect it to also be higher for less or more coverage. That said, let’s get to the definitions and what this means cost-wise and ecology-wise. Starter Cartridge: Have you ever purchased a new laser printer and wondered why the toner ran out sooner than expected? Some printer manufacturers include a starter cartridge so that it’s ready to use. However, this toner cartridge typically will yield less printed pages than a standard cartridge you buy separately. For this reason, it is called a starter reduced print yield cartridge. For example, a standard toner cartridge might typically print 2,600 pages (with 5% coverage) but the new printer may come with a cartridge that only prints 1,500 pages (with the same coverage). Many consumers do not know this, hence there are lots of questions at printer manufacturer forums asking “Why did my printer run out of toner so quickly?” Standard Yield Toner Cartridge: This one’s easier because just as the name implies, the yield is a standard amount. As mentioned above, for some cartridges the standard yield could be 2,600 pages with 5% coverage. High Yield Toner Cartridge: As the name implies, the yield for this type of cartridge is higher than for a standard cartridge. For example, the OEM (original equipment manufacturer) HP CE505X high yield black toner cartridge from HP for the LaserJet 05X series has a 6,500 page yield.  The HP CE505A standard, compatible Black Toner Cartridge for the same LaserJet 05X series  has a page yield of 2,300. At this writing, the high yield costs $161.97, and the standard costs $89.87 at SuperMediaStore.com That’s $0.02 cents per page for the high yield compared to $0.04 cents per page for the standard. Extended yield toner cartridge: This is the name that Micro Solutions Enterprises (MSE) and some of the other manufacturers use for toner cartridges that print more than the standard does. Jumbo toner cartridge: This name, used by a few other manufacturers, is also for toner cartridges with yield’s higher than standard cartridges. Whatever you call it – high yield, extended yield or jumbo, using toner cartridges that produce more pages than standard cartridges produce, not only saves money but is less harmful to the planet. High Yield Toner Cartridges and the Environment  While somewhat more toner is used with high yield, fewer cartridges are needed because each can print more pages. Returning to our example above, printing with 6,500 yield cartridges compared to 2,300 yield cartridges, not only saves .02 cents per page, it uses 2.8 times less cartridges. Green house gases are emitted during the manufacturing of cartridges. Manufacturing one toner cartridge (the cartridge alone without the toner) emits approximately 4.8kg CO2 into our atmosphere. Using standard yield instead means approximately 13.44 kg CO2 is released. Using fewer cartridges also...

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Calculating Toner Cost Per Page

In today’s shaky economy, businesses are more concerned than ever with budgets, including for their laser printer and copy machine usage. Calculating toner cost per page is also a concern among individuals who are also pinching pennies. Yet, laser printers and copy machines waste dollar after dollar when appropriate toner cartridges aren’t used. But there’s more to shopping for a good price on laser printer and copy machine toner cartridges than simply looking for the lowest price. Getting the best deal means calculating toner cost per page. The first thing to consider is the page yield noted on a toner cartridge package is likely not going to be the same page yield you actually get. This page yield is based on 5% coverage. It’s possible that all your printed pages will have this coverage, but it’s not likely unless you are only printing something like office memos. This page yield is based on the average usage in the United States for a monochrome (black only) page. Industry standards set this so consumers can  fairly compare page yield of toner cartridges and most toner cartridge manufacturers use it. I talk about this in more depth in a previous post titled “Toner Page Yield – Reality Check.” Monochrome vs Color Toner  When calculating toner cost per page, keep in mind you’re factoring for monochrome (black) and color. Monochrome (black toner): This is almost always used for text, not graphics. Divide the cost of the black cartridge by the page yield printed on the package. For example, divide the cost of this quality Linkyo black toner Brother TN450 compatible: $25.99 (as of October 2012) by its page yield of 2,600, and you see the cost per page is less than a penny. Color toner: When printing color, most printers use all the cartridges, even the black. So when calculating cost per page for color toner, you first calculate the cost per page for each of the color cartridges (many printers use three colors and one black) and add those costs. Then add the sum to the cost per page for the black toner. This will give you the total cost of the toner cartridges, per color page. For example, the cost per each of the four HP 126A compatible cartridges is $33.75, so the one black and three color cartridges total $135 (as of October 2012).  Divide this by the page yield, which is 1,000 for each of the color and you have a cost of $0.101 cents per page for those three. Then figure the cost of the HP126A black toner compatible, which is also $33.75 but has a page yield of 1,200. So the cost per page of the black toner cartridge is $0.028 cents. Add the color cost per page, $0.101 cents, to the monochrome cost per page, $0.028 cents, and you have a total cost per page of $0.129 cents. Toner page yield varies widely, but the HP 126A is a more spendy one. As Melissa Riofrio at PC World points out, more expensive printers usually mean more expensive toner. However, if you use a quality compatible toner cartridge, you can prevent your expensive laser printer from dictating your toner budget. That’s not what the printer manufacturers have in mind, but you can see a large difference in costs between HP original toner cartridges and a quality compatibles that are reliable.  Keep in mind that while this makes it possible to comparison shop, the page yield will vary. For example, due to the chemistry of the toner and the printing process, the cost goes up when printing with color toner. For color the actual page...

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