Why Buy LINKYO Remanufactured Epson Ink Cartridges?

If you’re on the market to buy a remanufactured Epson ink cartridge, you should know that there are two types of such cartridges on the market, one based on a new chip and the other based on a reset chip. What’s the difference? I’ll explain. A cartridge’s chip serves two purposes: To tell the printer the cartridge’s model and color To tell the printer the cartridge’s model and color A compatible cartridge’s chip uses a “page counter” to calculate the amount of ink is inside the cartridge; this method is inaccurate because it estimates the amount of ink based on the number of pages it has printed on. Each page, regardless of how much ink is actually used, is based on a pre-programmed estimate. Let’s illustrate this problem using Epson’s compatible 127 ink cartridges and the image above. The Epson compatible 127 cartridge has a calculated yield of 755 pgs. A printer will be equipped with colors black, cyan, magenta, and yellow. Magenta would be the primary color to print the image above. If you were to print out 377 pages of that image (half the 127 cartridge’s total yield), you’d have a printer reading the compatible magenta cartridge as being half-empty. The problem here is that the chips in the three other colors–black, cyan, and yellow–would also run as half-empty. Any color print, no matter what color is really being used, triggers the page counter in all the color cartridges. In the worst-case scenario, you could end up having an ink cartridge read as “empty” when it could actually be almost full. Let’s say you own one of these models of Epson WorkForce printers: WF-3520 WF-3530 WF-3540 WF-7010 WF-7510 WF-7520 All these printers can use a single model of ink cartridge, the Epson 127. The cartridges are available in four standard colors: black, cyan, magenta, and yellow. Cyan, magenta, and yellow have official yields of 755 pages. (Black has a higher yield than the rest.) Print 377 pages and, in theory, your cartridge is half-empty. Simple? Yes. Accurate? No. Let’s use an example with the above image showing of the two apples falling into water. Magenta is the primary color being used for this image. Print 377 pages of this image and your magenta ink cartridge will read as halfway-empty. You’re barely using the three other colors. Here’s where the problem of compatible ink cartridges creeps in. Even though magenta is the color being most affected, cyan and yellow would also read as being half-empty. (Black would read as being less empty because of its higher yield.) The “page counter” in each ink cartridge calculates based on a page used, no matter how much ink was really used in the process. In the worst-case scenario, you’d have an ink cartridge reading as empty when it could actually be almost full. You could have the reverse happen, as well: A cartridge could read as almost full when it’s really almost empty. This happens because a print could use up more color than is considered standard. Each of LINKYO’s remanufactured ink cartridges uses a reset chip from the Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). This reset chip guides the cartridge’s sensor to make an accurate reading on how much ink is available. Using this system, printing the above butterfly image would only affect the readings of the cyan and black ink cartridges because those are the two being used. Had it been using the prior “compatible” model, all color readings–including magenta and yellow–would be lower, even though some colors weren’t even used. LINKYO remanufactured process involves cleaning and repairing the OEM ink...

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How to Fix Canon Printer Ink Error

Why am I getting Canon printer ink error – ink is emptry or low – after installing remanufactured Canon ink cartridges? It’s common for remanufactured Canon ink cartridges to read as empty or low. This is because the ink monitoring chip in the cartridge (especially the ones with built-in print heads) is intended for one-time use only. DON’T PANIC! Your remanufactured Canon ink cartridges are indeed full and ready to print. Simply ignore the message, click OK (or CONTINUE), and continue to print. Some printers, particularly Canon inkjet models, won’t print if the cartridge reads as empty. You’ll likely receive an error message, such as the following: Canon printer ink error message indicating that your ink is low or empty. Canon printer ink error message indicating that your ink has run out and for your to replace the cartridge You can bypass these error messages by holding down your printer’s RESUME, STOP/RESET, or COLOR START button for 5 to 15 sec. The ink monitor will shut off, the printer will stop blinking, and the printer itself will resume printing. Lastly, here are some more troubleshooting tips to help improve remanufactured Canon ink cartridge’s performance. Always perform printer cleaning cycle, deep cleaning, and alignment test after you install new ink cartridges in your printer. Print a few test pages to ensure proper ink flow and correct alignment. If the printer does not recognize the cartridge, remove the cartridge and gently wipe the electrical contacts of the cartridge using a clean paper towel or a lint-free cloth. This is to remove the dust and residue that may have been blocking the electrical contacts from the printer. If the printer still does not recognize the cartridge, try taking out the unrecognized cartridge, turn off the power on the printer and unplug the printer for about 30 to 60 seconds. Plug and power the printer back on and reinstall the cartridge and print. For cartridges with print heads, sometimes the cartridge has been kept flat or upside down for weeks or months, therefore inks are not reaching to the print head which prevents the new ink cartridge from printing. To clean, gently place the cartridge with the print head facing down on a damp paper towel until ink flow is visible. Reinstall the ink cartridge and...

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What’s the Difference? HP 940 vs 940xl Ink

Many people have inquired regarding cost savings on Original HP 940 VS 940XL ink cartridges. Here’s a brief guide that explains the difference. The HP 940 compared to the HP 940XL reveals two major differences. The first of course is the price. Retail pricing on HP’s site as of this writing was $26.98 for the HP 940 black ink cartridge and $38.99 for the HP 940XL high yield black ink cartridge. However, the second difference between the HP 940 and the 940XL is revealing: The “XL” version of the black ink will print more than twice as many pages. I compared the lists of compatible printers for each cartridge right on the HP website and found them to be exactly the same. So, the upshot is that if you use the HP 940, you can also use the 940XL. The number of pages printed with ink cartridges is standardized in testing guidelines under ISO 24711. By that standard, HP indicates that an HP 940 black ink cartridge will print 1,000 pages and the 940XL will print 2,200. On the other hand, the HP 940 color cartridges (cyan, magenta, and yellow) print 900 pages and the color 940XL print 1,400 – not quite twice as...

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What’s the Difference? HP 564 vs 564XL Ink

The Original HP 564 and 564XL are two ink cartridges commonly found in HP Photosmart and Deskjet printers. As we all know, buying ink can be pricey – but here’s a quick guide on the difference between HP 564 and 564XL. The Original HP 564 and 564XL ink cartridge is available in five colors: Black, Photo Black, Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow. A black cartridge contains twice the ink that a color (magenta, yellow, and cyan) cartridge, but yields fewer pages according to the International Standards Organization (ISO). The 564 and 564XL are interchangeable. The only difference between the two types is that the XL contains more ink. Take a look at this table for the black ink cartridges:   Cartridge Model Ink Capacity Page Yield 564 7.5mL 250 pgs. 564XL 14mL 550 pgs.   Black contains more ink per cartridge than do the color cartridges, but it yields fewer total pages. The 564 cyan cartridge holds 3.5 mL of ink, but yields 300 pgs. Yellow is the same. (Magenta holds 4.0 mL, but still yields 300 pgs.) One can see from this information that the XL delivers nearly twice the ink and page...

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Why Does a New Ink Cartridge Shows Empty?

Sometimes when you put a brand new ink cartridge in an inkjet printer, the screen shows that the cartridge is empty or not recognized. There are other messages that you might see, depending on the printer and software. The empty ink cartridge message may show up on the printer’s display or on the computer. Messages include “no cartridge,” “low ink,” “cartridge not recognized,” or some other condition that points to the new cartridges as the problem. I have even heard of printer software claiming the user just invalidated the printer warranty by inserting 3rd party ink cartridges. Are the new cartridges really empty? Are they really invalidating your printer warranty? Not likely, but it can happen on rare occasion due to defects. This happens most frequently with remanufactured or compatible inks and there are many reasons for it. In fact, many printer manufacturers go out of their way to make sure you get this supposed ‘error’ message. First of all, when you install the new ink cartridge, make sure the protective tape is removed. This protection usually covers the ink port and electrical contacts, if there are any. Always make sure you are replacing the right cartridge. If it still gives the error message, you may have another cartridge that needs attention. Even if you only need to use black ink for a print job, many printers insist that all cartridges have some ink. Also, make sure the contacts on the ink cartridge and printer are clean. You can use a paper towel with a little alcohol, a lint-free cloth, a special contact cleaning solution or even distilled water. If you use a liquid cleaner it is best to unplug the printer and then dry the surface that was wet with the cleaning solution before plugging it back in. Those pesky chips Most of us love the modern conveniences that electronics give us, but they can also work against us. Printer manufacturers very often include chips in the ink cartridges that help keep track of ink usage and sometimes are used against your best cost saving intentions. For example, many chips are used to counts pages printed with an ink cartridge and then keep a record of that count. They do not actually measure ink levels. Refilling will not reset the level in the chip either. So, even if you put the cartridge in another printer, it will still report as empty. And if that is not enough, since some print heads presumably would be damaged if they run out of ink, the printer firmware or software reports the cartridge empty before it really is. I’ve seen many people comment that they figured out how to trick the printer into continuing to print with a cartridge that was showing out of ink and were able to print many more pages. In remanufactured cartridges, the chips sometimes have a record of how many pages were printed and they cannot be reset, even though the ink tank is refilled to maximum capacity. As a result the printer reads the chips and tells you that the cartridges are empty, even though they are not. Some printers will keep track of the last several ink cartridges by codes like serial numbers, so they can tell when you return to a cartridge it has already used. When that happens, the printer firmware of software will again complain about the ink cartridge with an error message. At times, manufacturers of compatible or remanufactured ink cartridges can install new chips or reset them. That helps eliminate the error messages. But not all the remanufactured cartridges can have...

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